Why you should not learn to code

Discussion in 'Programming' started by fan27, Jun 7, 2019.

  1. I just hope some day AI gets good enough that we can get rid of all the IT people.
    I would never work in IT and have to deal with that every day. It is just the worst culture possible.
     
    #51     Jun 8, 2019
  2. d08

    d08

    Isn't that a very specific condition to add to the statement?
     
    #52     Jun 8, 2019
  3. Simples

    Simples

    Culture created by leaders, management and decisionmakers. We got exactly the culture those people fostered, until other more human-friendly and sustainable focus is re-established.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
    #53     Jun 8, 2019
    Nobert and d08 like this.
  4. fan27

    fan27

    I don't know what your experience has been, but the tech company I worked at for 13 years had a great culture. There is a difference working for a tech company where the tech is the profit center vs working for a company where the tech is the cost center. The former is preferable.
     
    #54     Jun 8, 2019
  5. Ayn Rand

    Ayn Rand

    Trade first. It you have some extra time code later. Code for what? Code for why?

    You trade first. If you have an edge or idea then you code later.

    Code should only be adding a few percent to something that is winning.
     
    #55     Jun 8, 2019
    TimmyTaipan and nooby_mcnoob like this.
  6. themickey

    themickey

    Coding is very time consuming and it has the effect on me of being a magnet, pulls you in to do even more coding.
    But the results are it's a little bit like xray eyes, it brings out information not visible to the naked eye, highlighting information which you are looking for and presented as data rather than a chart.
    With a chart you only see bars, with data you see opportunities.
    So while the coding may be time consuming, the results become time saving.
     
    #56     Jun 8, 2019
  7. Ayn Rand

    Ayn Rand

    I am not saying that coding is not good. If you can do everything then code and trade is ideal. However, my caveat is that first you learn to trade, and then you learn to code.
     
    #57     Jun 8, 2019
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  8. themickey

    themickey

    Agree.
    ....my experience, it then makes for a better trader again, seeing things in the trading world which isn't normally obvious.
     
    #58     Jun 8, 2019
  9. zdave83

    zdave83

    I believe the need for coding, or more descriptively "automated strategy testing", depends on what and how you trade. For example, I trade baskets of equity/index options, and there aren't enough hours in a day/week/year/lifetime to manually analyze all the possible combinations of rights, strikes, expirations, ratios, greeks, etc ...... to optimize trades like these.

    Maybe you trade strategies that can be analyzed/optimized manually without coding ... and that's great. But there is a world of trading strategies that require the statistical processing capacity of a computer to test and optimize.

    Good trading !
     
    #59     Jun 9, 2019
    d08 likes this.
  10. kj5159

    kj5159

    Holy crap is this right! I started an online "learn to code in a few months" course hoping to learn some crude python skills to write some simple algos with like 5-10 "if" and similar conditions with different combos of those conditions to backtest and mostly fool around with it. Good gravy Batman was that miserable, debugging and trying to figure why the simplest stuff to me was so hard and awkward to try to tell a computer to do etc. etc. etc.
     
    #60     Jun 9, 2019