traders who are deeply religious

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by hermit_trader, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. Can they handle the pressure better than others? Can they withstand the ups and downs easier than people who are not religious?
     
  2. jmho

    "deeply religious" people do not trade.
    Deeply religious people trust The Providence.

    Once they start to trade they sin:
    1. not trusting Providence
    2. trying to predict He's moves
    3. wanting to get more than their shares (greed)
    4. worst of all, trying to cheat Him.

    But

    They can still fake Him by using a new concept:

    Online Trading is a Computer Game.
    You pay to play.
    If you play it well, you get a fat bonus.

    :D
     
  3. Saint Paul said (something like): "Prayer without the works is death".

    So in between your prayers, trade the hell out of it. (If you prefer, you could also pray in between your trades).
    :cool:
     
  4. "Deeply religious people" is a very broad term. I'm assuming you are not meaning Christian only, for all world religions have deeply religious people, as well as those who nominally claim a faith, but who don't practice it.

    My wife and I are deeply religious people, and we trade. So cooldude is wrong in what he says (though I suspect he was speaking tongue in cheek).

    I also suspect that handling the pressure is determined by personality, rather than religion or faith. Personality and emotional makeup do not change when one becomes deeply religious. A religious experience does not make one perfect. If one has character flaws at the time of the religous experience, they will still be there after, and will need to be worked on. If one is an emotional person before, they will be one after. If one is even tempered before, they will be after. While a person who has undergone a religious experience may change some things in an instance, such as habits or lifestyle, changes in personality and psyche take time, and in fact they will never be perfected.

    If trading is a business—an occupation, as opposed to a vice—why could not deeply religous people choose that as an occupation? It is my wife's occupation, my night-time second job. I find that we do not do as good a job handling the pressure as we would like. But then, I don't always handle the pressure of being an engineer as well as I'd like either.

    As for prayer, I have never yet requested that God make one of my possitions go up, or profitable. As with other endeavors in life, I have prayed that God would help me to be the best trader that I can be.

    Best Regards,
    NDG
     
  5. I pray most every day at some point.

    Don't ask for profits, but do ask for patience, wisdom and peace.

    After every successful day, I give thanks.
     
  6. bighog

    bighog Guest

    The deeply religious traders probably got that way the same way crooks get religion. FROM LOSING .....:D
     
  7. Dear Jebus,

    Lazarus here, .....you suck .....still.

    I hate you so much(Eric Cartman).

    I'm still rich.....where are you.

    You suck. I hate you so much.

    Love,
    Lazarus,
     
  8. I think we all pray when our stocks go against us :)
     
  9. No, we are not in them. When we realize that we are wrong, we take our loss and move on to the next opportunity. We dont let the loss compound into a disaster. (Unless we are stuck in a huge gap up or gap down, then we are f*cked)



     
  10. dac8555

    dac8555

    interesting thought..and topic. I had some similar thoughts the other day as i was contemplating the difference between gambling in a casino and in the markets. In my mind, there is not much difference, you are playing the odds to some degree. However, i never understood how gambling was considered a vice by some chistian religions (not sure if there are others that feel the same way)..for me it is a buinsess and a form of entertainment. So are horse races, sports betting, what ever.

    it is a topic or a discussion that you cant win or come to a conclusion on.

    dare i say this thread will be at almost certain risk of turing into a heated debate which may not be conducive to trading knowledge.
     
    #10     Dec 14, 2005