This Is Why Women Don't Belong In Combat

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by pspr, Sep 19, 2012.

  1. pspr


    A British soldier who did not know she was pregnant has given birth on the frontline.

    The woman had a son in Camp Bastion on Tuesday – just days after the Taliban launched a deadly attack on the UK’s main base in Helmand.

    The baby was born five weeks premature. Last night both mother and child were said to be doing well.

    A paediatric team from the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford will travel to Afghanistan in the next few days to provide care for the soldier and her son on their RAF flight home.

    The birth has stunned military chiefs and led to calls for extra medical checks on women who are sent to the warzone.

    Almost 200 troops have discovered they were pregnant at war since 2003 – forcing commanders to send them straight back to Britain. But this is the first time a UK soldier has given birth to a baby in Afghanistan.

    The soldier, a gunner in the Royal Artillery who helped provide covering fire for troops fighting insurgents, was unaware that she was carrying a child.
  2. I think the better argument is that pregnant women don't belong in combat. Make the gals pee on a stick before shipping them out.
  3. Lucrum


    I think most women don't belong in combat.
    There are exceptions, the Russians used a lot of women in WWII. At least one of which was among their best snipers.
  4. BSAM


    Women don't belong in combat.
    This is common sense.
    Of course, the government has no common sense, so...
  5. wtf: nearly 8 months pregnant and you don't know it?

    BS, I submit she just was afraid to reveal it to anyone in the chain of command.

    or she was a 300 pound beast.
  6. quite frankly there was little difference between soldier and civilian russia circa 1942
  7. pspr


    Or both. I didn't see any description of her or pic in the story.
  8. 377OHMS


    How can a woman not know she is pregnant? Wouldn't the lack of menstruation for 9 consecutive months be a clue?

    Yeah, she must have been in huge denial and just didn't report it.
  9. I'm not going to claim expertise here but I could see where the stress of combat might make menstruation a bit more variable.

    I don't really know about denial , I suspect she was afraid of non-judicial punishment.

    Been there done that :D :D
  10. 377OHMS


    When I was active-duty USAF I knew a few girls who were getting out of undesirable assignments by substituting urine from a pregnant woman into their sample during medical examinations.

    Their orders would be cancelled and then miraculously their pregnancy would suddenly just disappear at some later point. I saw that work repeatedly when friends did not want to serve in S.Korea or the Philippines back in the day. I can understand a woman not wanting to live in those locations I guess.
    #10     Sep 19, 2012