Santorum: Separation Of Church And State 'Makes Me Want To Throw Up'

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by Free Thinker, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. Rick Santorum on Sunday took on separation of church and state.

    "I don't believe in an America where the separation of church and state are absolute," he told 'This Week' host George Stephanopoulos. "The idea that the church can have no influence or no involvement in the operation of the state is absolutely antithetical to the objectives and vision of our country.
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/26/santorum-church-and-state_n_1302246.html
     
  2. Brass

    Brass

    Santorum should be more concerned about separation of brain and mouth. And the lack of separation of foot and mouth.
     
  3. kut2k2

    kut2k2

    The only good thing about Rick Santorum is that he has a chance of stealing Michigan from Romney, which would just power up the spotlight on Mittens' shortcomings. "Let Detroit Go Bankrupt." What a douchebag.
     
  4. Brass

    Brass

    Yes, wasn't that a delight? And it's not going away.
     
  5. I agree that if they let the city of Detroit go bankrupt it would help it recover better.......oh, BTW same for the auto companies.

    Wait until gas hits $4-$5, GM will be in trouble again.
     
  6. Wallet

    Wallet

    Santorum is correct, the founding fathers had no intention of separating Religion from Government, what they didn't want was for Religion to be mandated or regulated by Government. In essence protecting Religion for Government, not the other way around as we currently misinterpret.

    You can spin all the agnostic, atheistic crap you want, if anyone would just do some genuine investigation into the thoughts and beliefs of the founding fathers, besides the cursory modern-day revisionist spin, they would find a group of deeply religious "Christian" patriots. Their Judea-Christian beliefs permeate their writings and are seen woven through our establishing documents.

    Let the God hating, atheistic rebuttals begin............
     
  7. Have you met that Muslim judge who said it was OK to beat up someone walking around in a zombie Mohammed suit?
    I'm sure that's not what you had in mind, but you know, that First Amendment was put there for a reason, one that neither you nor that judge seem to have the first clue about.
     
  8. http://www.infidels.org/library/modern/farrell_till/myth.html
    The Christian Nation Myth
    Fundamentalist Christians are currently working overtime to convince the American public that the founding fathers intended to establish this country on "biblical principles," but history simply does not support their view. The men mentioned above and others who were instrumental in the founding of our nation were in no sense Bible-believing Christians. Thomas Jefferson, in fact, was fiercely anti-cleric. In a letter to Horatio Spafford in 1814, Jefferson said, "In every country and every age, the priest has been hostile to liberty. He is always in alliance with the despot, abetting his abuses in return for protection to his own. It is easier to acquire wealth and power by this combination than by deserving them, and to effect this, they have perverted the purest religion ever preached to man into mystery and jargon, unintelligible to all mankind, and therefore the safer for their purposes" (George Seldes, The Great Quotations, Secaucus, New Jersey Citadel Press, 1983, p. 371). In a letter to Mrs. Harrison Smith, he wrote, "It is in our lives, and not from our words, that our religion must be read. By the same test the world must judge me. But this does not satisfy the priesthood. They must have a positive, a declared assent to all their interested absurdities. My opinion is that there would never have been an infidel, if there had never been a priest" (August 6, 1816).
     
  9. Brass

    Brass

    You have no concept of history. People fled the Old World, among other reasons, because religion was too entrenched in government. Religious persecution flourishes when one religion gets a foothold in government, to the detriment of others including none at all. It was the separation of church and state that marked one of the distinctions of the American experiment. At least that was the intent.

    And now YOU speak of revisionists? Don't ever lose that sense of humor.
     
  10. Wallet

    Wallet

    I'm not going to get into this debate, people can look for themselves...... every quote, link you give I can point elsewhere that contradicts in overwhelming evidence.

    The idea that America's Founding Fathers were "Christian" and Deeply Religious individuals isn't something "new" or that there's some type of agenda to pull a fast one on the American people..... it's been the long held view and what has been taught in schools for centuries, until very recent. No the revisionism comes from an atheistic attempt to separate this country from it's original roots, to eradicate all mention or intention of God from the annals of American history.

    You have to look no father that what's written above in our US House and Senate chambers " IN GOD WE TRUST" or the fact that all Senate sessions for the past 200+ years are opened with prayer.

    From their (US Senates) own website, " Throughout the years, the United States Senate has honored the historic separation of Church and State, but not the separation of God and State."

    Your attempts are feeble at best, take it somewhere else.
     
    #10     Feb 27, 2012