Paulson: U.S. home prices to fall, What a JOKE!!!!

Discussion in 'Wall St. News' started by S2007S, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. S2007S

    S2007S

    You know what I find so interesting about this article that just a year ago he would have said what subprime mortgage meltdown? 6 months ago he wouldnt even believe that there would be over 2 million houses going into foreclosure, 2 months ago he thought the credit crisis was over, but fast foward to today and the truth is coming out, now everything he says is everything he SHOULD have said 2 years ago. How come now, no one wants to hear what he has to say today, maybe 2 years he could have told us this, but at that time GREED controlled the market and wallstreet, today FEAR controls it and when FEAR controls it the truth seems to come out alot easier.



    http://biz.yahoo.com/rb/080702/usa_paulson_economy.htm




    "There is no easy solution that will immediately relieve current financial market stress or protect against future problems and market challenges which will inevitably occur," he said.l
     
  2. S2007S

    S2007S

    Paulson: U.S. home prices to fall

    Wed Jul 2, 11:02 AM ET

    LONDON (Reuters) - U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said on Wednesday that high oil prices, further home price declines and capital markets turmoil will prolong the American economy's slowdown, while Europe and the UK were also showing signs of slower growth.


    Paulson, in remarks prepared for delivery to the Chatham House think tank here, said U.S. home foreclosures will remain elevated and "we should not be surprised at continued reports of falling home prices."

    "Today, the U.S. economy is going through a rough period. And while we have seen better growth in Europe over the last few quarters, there are signs of a slowdown in Europe in general and the UK specifically," Paulson said.

    "However, emerging economies are expected to continue a period of strong growth, which will support global growth overall."

    Paulson's speech largely focused on his plans to strengthen the unwinding process for large insolvent financial institutions to allow "orderly" failures.

    Paulson said financial institutions face a tough earnings environment as they adjust to changes brought about by high oil prices and the housing slowdown. He reiterated his call for banks to strengthen balance sheets by raising new capital, de-leveraging or reviewing dividend policies.

    He said banks in the United States and the UK have raised capital equal to 95 and 96 percent of their recognized credit losses, respectively, but in continental Europe, institutions have covered only 56 percent of recognized losses with new capital so far.

    "There is no easy solution that will immediately relieve current financial market stress or protect against future problems and market challenges which will inevitably occur," he said.

    Paulson was in London on the final leg of a five-day trip to Russia, Germany and Britain to meet political leaders, finance chiefs and central bankers to discuss economic and trade issues.
     
  3. He's a politician, he doesn't want to admit anything until there is a scapegoat other than the political administration. Right now, they're blaming it on the irresponsible, evil bankers.
     
  4. Paulson is proof that you can reach the top of the best I-bank in the world having the first clue how to speculate.