Passin a Bill into Law

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by The Bishop, Dec 18, 2009.

  1. Question concerning the process of a bill becoming a law:

    After House and Senate vote and come up with their respective bills, they go to Conference to come up with a compromise bill that then goes back to both chambers to be voted on again. When it returns to the Senate, is it still subject to a filibuster or is it only a straight yes/no vote and they only need 51 to move it to the President's desk for signing? And if so, then why doesn't the Senate just appease the holdouts and then "correct" a bill once in Conference to get their desired results?

    Or is it that the Senate can only "bargain" with what was approved in their chamber and it is the House which must alter their proposals?

    Pardon the ignorance.
     
  2. And if so, then why doesn't the Senate just appease the holdouts and then "correct" a bill once in Conference to get their desired results?
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    Your answer could easily enough be found on Wiki, but this will only answer the mechanics.

    As for the "desired" results? The "Bill" is superficial and has nothing to do with the desired results, if this so happens it is merely a coincidence.

    The desired result: reassignment of political capital (power), money (ie campaign contributions, lobby efforts benefitting industry) votes and misc Congressional benefits.