Our "Justice" system at work again

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by hapaboy, Jun 3, 2004.

  1. Another example of violent felons being released over and over:

    Released sex offender charged with 2 murders
    Syracuse police conducting searches for additional victims
    Thursday, June 3, 2004 Posted: 11:07 AM EDT (1507 GMT)

    SYRACUSE, New York (CNN) -- Two days after a convicted sex offender confessed to killing two women in his apartment building, police said Thursday they were carrying out additional searches and believed they could find more bodies.

    Nicholas Lee Wiley, 41, who had been released from prison in January, was arraigned Wednesday on two counts of second-degree murder after the bodies of two women were found in his apartment building.

    The Syracuse Police Department said Wiley "indicated that there are other victims."

    Monday, police found the body of a 31-year-old woman in her apartment in the same building in which Wiley lives, according to Sgt. Thomas Connellan.

    While crime scene investigators searched the building Tuesday, the body of a 22-year-old woman was found in the building's trash bin.

    Both women had been stabbed multiple times and their throats were slashed.

    Lamar Kearse, the building's landlord, said Wiley had lived there a few months.

    "He's quiet, stayed to [himself]," Kearse said. "He was looking for odd work. I let him cut the grass or stuff like that. I never assumed he was the way he is."

    Connellan told CNN that Wiley was taken in for questioning Monday after investigators learned that the Level 3 sex offender lived in the same building. A Level 3 offender is considered by law enforcement to be at the highest risk to commit the crime again. Wiley had been released from prison in late January after serving a sentence for sexually assaulting a teenage girl.

    Wiley confessed Tuesday to killing both women, Connellan said.

    "We are investigating the possibility of more, unreported victims," the sergeant said.

    The current charges may be upgraded to first-degree murder if autopsies on the victims show evidence of torture, or if more victims are found. A first-degree murder charge would make Wiley eligible for the death penalty.

    His record also includes convictions and prison sentences for beating and robbing a woman in her 60s in 1983 and stabbing a woman in the chest in 1979. After a 1991 release, Wiley beat and sexually assaulted a 16-year-old girl on his 29th birthday, according to Connellan. In March 1992, he was convicted of first-degree sodomy and sentenced to 12 to 25 years behind bars, the maximum penalty.

    Connellan said this conviction was overturned because of a legal technicality, and Wiley was convicted on a lesser charge and sentenced to 6 to 12 years in prison.

    After his January release, Wiley was required to report every 90 days to police, which he did, Connellan said.
     
  2. Of course our government needs to free all these perverts and murderers...how else could they find room to imprison their millions of political prisoners who committed the ghastly crime of helping others to get high?

    You know damned well there is a direct connection here. Before Reagan's war on drugs, these dangerous violent criminals were kept in prison for proper lengths of time.
     
  3. Pabst

    Pabst


    In 2001, drug law violators comprised 20.4% of all adults serving time in State prisons - 246,100 out of 1,208,700 State prison inmates.

    Source: Harrison, Paige M. & Allen J. Beck, US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2002 (Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, July 2003), Table 17, p. 10.


    "Nineteen percent of State prisoners, and 16% of Federal inmates said that they committed their current offense to obtain money for drugs. These percentages represent a slight increase from 1991, when 17% of State and 10% of Federal prisoners identified drug money as a motive for their current offense."

    Source: Mumola, Christopher J., "Substance Abuse and Treatment, State and Federal Prisoners, 1997" (Washington, DC: US Dept. of Justice, January 1999), p. 5.


    So only 1 in 5 state prisoners are serving time for drugs. Also 1 in 5 prisoners committed money crimes in pursuit of drugs. I'm not against limited decriminalization but the numbers aren't that skewed.
     
  4. Now that is an interesting stat. To bring it a step further, most who were committing crimes were more than likely addicted to either crack/smack. If this is true then you can't really use the argument that if these drugs were legalized they would be cheaper and you wouldn't have so many crimes committed to support habbits. These two drugs are hella cheap. If im not mistaken $5 worth of smack today buys 30 times more (when factoring in potency) then it did in 1970 :eek:
     
  5. http://www.drugwarfacts.org/prison.htm

    <b>"Prisoners sentenced for drug offenses constituted the largest group of Federal inmates (55%) in 2001, down from 60% in 1995 (table 18). On September 30, 2001, the date of the latest available data in the Federal Justice Statistics Program, Federal prisons held 78,501 sentenced drug offenders, compared to 52,782 in 1995." </b>

    Source: Harrison, Paige M. & Allen J. Beck, PhD, US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2002 (Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, July 2003), p. 11.


    In 2001, drug law violators comprised 20.4% of all adults serving time in State prisons - 246,100 out of 1,208,700 State prison inmates.

    Source: Harrison, Paige M. & Allen J. Beck, US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2002 (Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, July 2003), Table 17, p. 10.


    Over 80% of the increase in the federal prison population from 1985 to 1995 was due to drug convictions.

    Source: US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 1996 (Washington DC: US Department of Justice, 1997).


    "Between 1984 and 1999, the number of defendants charged with a drug offense in U.S. district courts increased about 3% annually, on average, from 11,854 to 29,306."

    Source: Scalia, John, US Dept. of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Federal Drug Offenders, 1999 with Trends 1984-99 (Washington, DC: US Dept. of Justice, August 2001), p. 7.


    "As a result of increased prosecutions and longer time served in prison, the number of drug offenders in Federal prisons increased more than 12% annually, on average, from 14,976 during 1986 to 68,360 during 1999."

    Source: Scalia, John, US Dept. of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Federal Drug Offenders, 1999 with Trends 1984-99 (Washington, DC: US Dept. of Justice, August 2001), p. 7.


    According to ONDCP, federal spending to incarcerate drug offenders totals nearly $3 Billion a year -- $2.525 Billion by the Bureau of Prisons, and $429.4 Million by Federal Prisoner Detention.

    Source: Office of National Drug Control Policy, "National Drug Control Strategy: FY 2003 Budget Summary" (Washington, DC: Office of the President, February 2002), Table 3, pp. 7-9.


    "The United States has the highest prison population rate in the world, some 701 per 100,000 of the national population, followed by Russia (606), Belarus (554), Kazakhstan and the Virgin Islands (both 522), the Cayman Islands (501), Turkmenistan (489), Belize (459), Bermuda (447), Suriname (437), Dominica (420) and Ukraine (415). "However, more than three fifths of countries (60.5%) have rates below 150 per 100,000. United Kingdom’s rate of 141 per 100,000 of the national population places it above midpoint in the World List; it is the highest among countries of the European Union.)"

    Source: Walmsley, Roy, "World Prison Population List (Fifth Edition)" (London, England, UK: Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, 2003), p. 1.


    "Over 9 million people are held in penal institutions throughout the world, mostly as pre-trial detainees (remand prisoners) or having been convicted and sentenced. About half of these are in the United States (2.03m), Russia (0.86m) or China (1.51m plus pre-trial detainees and prisoners in 'administrative detention')." According to the US Census Bureau, the population of the US represents 4.6% of the world's total population (291,450,886 out of a total 6,303,683,217).

    Source: Walmsley, Roy, "World Prison Population List (Fifth Edition)" (London, England, UK: Home Office Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, 2003), p. 1.; US Census Bureau, Population Division, from the web at http://www.census.gov/main/www/popclock.html accessed July 8, 2003.


    "Overall, the United States incarcerated 2,166,260 persons at yearend 2002." This total represents persons held in:

    Federal and State Prisons 1,361,258 (which excludes State and Federal prisoners in local jails
    Territorial Prisons 16,206
    Local Jails 665,475
    INS Facilities 8,748
    Military Facilities 2,377
    Jails in Indian Country 1,912 (as of midyear 2001)
    Juvenile Facilities 110,284 (as of October 2000)

    Source: Harrison, Paige M. & Allen J. Beck, PhD, US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2002 (Washington DC: US Department of Justice, July 2003), p. 1.


    "The rate of incarceration in prison and jail was 701 inmates per 100,000 residents in 2002, up from 601 in 1995. At yearend 2002, 1 in every 143 U.S. residents were incarcerated in State or Federal prison or a local jail."

    Source: Harrison, Paige M. & Allen J. Beck, PhD, US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2002 (Washington DC: US Department of Justice, July 2003), p. 2.


    The U.S. nonviolent prisoner population is larger than the combined populations of Wyoming and Alaska.

    Source: John Irwin, Ph. D., Vincent Schiraldi, and Jason Ziedenberg, America's One Million Nonviolent Prisoners (Washington, DC: Justice Policy Institute, 1999), pg. 4.


    "Since 1995 the sentenced inmate population in State prisons has grown 27% (table 4). During this period 12 States increased their populations at least 50%, led by North Dakota (up 88%), Idaho (up 86%), and Oregon (up 85%). Between 1995 and 2002 the Federal system reported an additional 59,377 inmates sentenced to more than a year, an increase of 71%."

    Source: Harrison, Paige M. & Allen J. Beck, PhD, US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2002 (Washington DC: US Department of Justice, July 2003), p. 4.


    "In 2002 the growth in the number of inmates under State or Federal jurisdiction (2.6%) was more than twice the percentage increase recorded during 2001 (1.1%) (table 2). The population under the jurisdiction of State and Federal authorities increased by 36,623 inmates during 2002, higher than the increase in 2001 (up 15,521). The prison population has grown an average of 45,000 inmates per year (3.6%) since yearend 1995."

    Source: Harrison, Paige M. & Allen J. Beck, PhD, US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2002 (Washington DC: US Department of Justice, July 2003), p. 2.


    According to the US Justice Department, between 1990 and 2000 "Overall, the percentage of violent Federal inmates declined from 17% to 10%. While the number of offenders in each major offense category increased, the number incarcerated for a drug offense accounted for the largest percentage of the total growth (59%), followed by public-order offenders (32%)."

    Source: Beck, Allen J., Ph.D., and Paige M. Harrison, US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2001 (Washington DC: US Department of Justice, July 2002), p. 14.


    There were 5.9 million adults in the 'correctional population' by the end of 1998. This means that 2.9% of the U.S. adult population -- 1 in every 34 -- was incarcerated, on probation or on parole.

    Source: Bonczar, Thomas & Glaze, Lauren, US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Probation and Parole in the United States (Washington DC: US Department of Justice, August 1999), p. 1.