Obama's Green Jobs Training A Slush Fund

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by pspr, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. pspr

    pspr

    President Obama’s green jobs training program, which was part of his stimulus, has failed on most key jobs measures, according to a new internal audit that found it was training workers who already had jobs that didn’t need green energy skills, and was failing to place new enrollees in jobs once they finished the training.

    The Energy Department’s inspector general also said grantees who received the green jobs-training money did a poor job of reporting their results.

    Only 38 percent of those who have completed training got jobs based on it, and only 16 percent kept jobs for at least six months — the key measure of success for the program.

    “Outcomes for participants were far less than originally proposed,” the auditors said.

    The government earmarked more than $400 million for green jobs training programs, and $328.5 million has been spent so far.

    The audit was released by House oversight committee Chairman Darrell E. Issa, who requested the update.

    Mr. Issa said in addition to poor performance records, the green jobs money “served as a slush fund” for the Obama administration to dole out payments to allies “like the National Council of La Raza, the Blue Green alliance and the U.S. Steelworkers Union.”
     
  2. Standard procedure in this administration.

    ===================================

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/newswe...ative-energy-programs-became-green-graft.html

    In March 2011, for example, the GAO examined the first 18 loans that were approved and found that none were properly documented. It also noted that officials “did not always record the results of analysis” of these applications. A loan program for electric cars, for example, “lacks performance measures.” No notes were kept during the review process, so it is difficult to determine how loan decisions were made. The GAO further declared that the Department of Energy “had treated applicants inconsistently in the application review process, favoring some applicants and disadvantaging others.” The Department of Energy’s inspector general, Gregory Friedman, who was not a political appointee, chastised the alternative-energy loan and grant programs for their absence of “sufficient transparency and accountability.” He has testified that contracts have been steered to “friends and family.”