Mourning the death of evidence in Canada

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by Brass, Jul 10, 2012.

  1. Brass

    Brass

    OTTAWA - Scientists will gather in Ottawa today to stage what’s billed as a funeral procession to mourn the death of evidence.

    The protest sponsored by the Council of Canadians is scheduled to begin at the Ottawa Convention Centre at 12 p.m. ET and proceed to Parliament Hill.

    The Council says scientific evidence plays a key role guiding the decisions of Canadian leaders but has been silenced due to what it calls a ”series of severe injuries.”

    It cites cuts to research programs in Environment Canada, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the National Research Council of Canada, Statistics Canada and elsewhere.

    The Council also decries cuts to the National Science Adviser, Law Commission of Canada, and National Round Table on Environment and Economy.

    Dr. Scott Findlay, associate professor and former director the University of Ottawa’s Institute of Environment, says the ”death of Evidence is a cause for national mourning.”

    He said in a release there is ”systematic campaign to reduce the flow of scientific evidence to Canadians.”

    “As a result, the public hears and sees only information that supports federal government policy or ideology. That’s not evidence, that’s propaganda.”

    Speakers are expected to address the rally include Council chair Maude Barlow and Ted Hsu, the Liberal Party critic for science and technology.

    http://www.vancouversun.com/technol...awa+protest+death+evidence/6909007/story.html
     
  2. most of "science's" ideas would never survive without massive public funding. Let them compete in the real marketplace, let them get funding by entering into debates with everybody else that runs a school and see how many students they will have when the dust settles. That would be the death of evolution theory actually. Not too many people get that.
     
  3. Brass

    Brass

    Parody?
     
  4. Ricter

    Ricter

    Based on his posts, probably not.

    Might be a good idea for a scifi novel, though. A time traveler goes back and "excises" all scientific ideas that were created by scientists with some from of patronage or subsidy, then he returns to his own time to see the result.