More evidence Bush misled the American people

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by ZZZzzzzzzz, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. PREWAR INTELLIGENCE
    Insulating Bush

    By Murray Waas, National Journal
    National Journal Group Inc.
    Thursday, March 30, 2006

    Karl Rove, President Bush's chief political adviser, cautioned other White House aides in the summer of 2003 that Bush's 2004 re-election prospects would be severely damaged if it was publicly disclosed that he had been personally warned that a key rationale for going to war had been challenged within the administration. Rove expressed his concerns shortly after an informal review of classified government records by then-Deputy National Security Adviser Stephen J. Hadley determined that Bush had been specifically advised that claims he later made in his 2003 State of the Union address -- that Iraq was procuring high-strength aluminum tubes to build a nuclear weapon -- might not be true, according to government records and interviews.

    Hadley was particularly concerned that the public might learn of a classified one-page summary of a National Intelligence Estimate, specifically written for Bush in October 2002. The summary said that although "most agencies judge" that the aluminum tubes were "related to a uranium enrichment effort," the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research and the Energy Department's intelligence branch "believe that the tubes more likely are intended for conventional weapons."

    Three months after receiving that assessment, the president stated without qualification in his January 28, 2003, State of the Union address: "The British government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa. Our intelligence sources tell us that he has attempted to purchase high-strength aluminum tubes suitable for nuclear weapons production."

    The previously undisclosed review by Hadley was part of a damage-control effort launched after former Ambassador Joseph C. Wilson IV alleged that Bush's claims regarding the uranium were not true. The CIA had sent Wilson to the African nation of Niger in 2002 to investigate the purported procurement efforts by Iraq; he reported that they were most likely a hoax.

    The White House was largely successful in defusing the Niger controversy because there was no evidence that Bush was aware that his claims about the uranium were based on faulty intelligence. Then-CIA Director George Tenet swiftly and publicly took the blame for the entire episode, saying that he and the CIA were at fault for not warning Bush and his aides that the information might be untrue.

    But Hadley and other administration officials realized that it would be much more difficult to shield Bush from criticism for his statements regarding the aluminum tubes, for several reasons.

    For one, Hadley's review concluded that Bush had been directly and repeatedly apprised of the deep rift within the intelligence community over whether Iraq wanted the high-strength aluminum tubes for a nuclear weapons program or for conventional weapons.

    For another, the president and others in the administration had cited the aluminum tubes as the most compelling evidence that Saddam was determined to build a nuclear weapon -- even more than the allegations that he was attempting to purchase uranium.

    And finally, full disclosure of the internal dissent over the importance of the tubes would have almost certainly raised broader questions about the administration's conduct in the months leading up to war.

    Full story here:

    http://news.nationaljournal.com/articles/0330nj1.htm
     
  2. This is no surprise.

    Bush cherry picked intel to scare the public behind an empty war.
     
  3. Pabst

    Pabst

    Quote from ZZZzzzzzzz:

    "The British government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa. Our intelligence sources tell us that he has attempted to purchase high-strength aluminum tubes suitable for nuclear weapons production."

    Is there a falsehood contained in the President's statement? I didn't think so.

    For one, Hadley's review concluded that Bush had been directly and repeatedly apprised of the deep rift within the intelligence community over whether Iraq wanted the high-strength aluminum tubes for a nuclear weapons program or for conventional weapons.

    So there was merely a debate over what kind of weapons desired by Saddam? LOL. Gee how terrible that Bush took that guy out.


    http://news.nationaljournal.com/articles/0330nj1.htm
     
  4. You refuse, for partisan reasons of course, to look at all the data, the entire story of the rush to war....

    The decision was made to go to war, and the facts were fixed, and the country was misled in order to achieve that goal.

    If you could get Bush, Cheney, Rove, and Condi in a witness chair and grill them, I believe they are all dying to say, ala Colonel Jessup:

    "You're goddam right we fixed the intelligence to go to war, and we would do it again!"



     
  5. maxpi

    maxpi

    A high ranking official of Saddam's government got a book published recently, he told about how Saddam was hiding WMD's, they have taped conversations about the very same things, this "Bush Lied" thing is not going to fly. You will have to go back to "Hate Bush".
     
  6. LoZZZer.
     
  7. Let me guess, Bagdad Bob's new book.