Min. number of programs?

Discussion in 'Backup and Security' started by Pekelo, May 24, 2007.

  1. Pekelo


    What is the min. number of programs running in the backround (as shown in the Windows Task manager) and still be able to trade? My laptop has only 22, I thought that was pretty low.

    Also, does it matter if a program is on the list but its CPU usage is zero? Does that slow down the computer in any way?
  2. Bob111


    you talking about applications or processes?

    it's probably still consuming some memory, which may slowdown your computer
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  3. Pekelo


    Yes, I meant processes...

    I know some people have 40-70 running.
  4. Speed is related to skills.

    When you get very skilled, you are doing partial fills on market turns as a direct result of the market's capacity to support a given trading strategy.

    The difference in trading effectiveness and efficiency is not statistically significant now matter how tied up you think your computer may be.

    Most coded ops have decision making data completed sooner than the prem hits the floor (if there still is one) for example.

    High velocity trading (making money big time) doesn't diddle with computer stuff these days.
  5. huh????

    I don't think that helps the OP's initial question all that there Jack.
  6. nkhoi

    nkhoi Moderator

    keep them running until performance reach 80%, that should be about all your computer can handle.
  7. Helped me.
    As with nearly all of the man's posts.
    It's a thinkin' man's form of communication.
    Gotta love it. :)

  8. I usually find that "thinking men" prefer to communicate in clear and concise terms. To do anything else is both wasteful and obfuscative.

    ...There's an implicit conceit in your remarks that I find distasteful. I hope the impression I'm getting is wrong...
  9. I agree Fj- professionals don't have time to try to decipher a message. "Thinking men" ie, those with too much time on their hands, may enjoy cryptic messages.
    #10     May 27, 2007