If Americans belieave in democracy why work with China!!!!

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by mahram, Aug 1, 2006.

Do americans belieave in democracy ?

  1. yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. no

    1 vote(s)
    100.0%
  1. If you guys belieave in democracy why do you work with china? If you really belieave in democracy stop working with china. Even if that means 100's of billions in losses for the united states and its corporation :D
     
  2. This question is nonsense.

    There is no clear-cut totalitarian regime vs democracy. China may be a deeper shade of grey but certainly not the Maoist communist country 30 years. It's very different than the country it was during the Tiananmen massacre.

    What a true democracy should do in the world, is to promote democracy elsewhere only if this does not directly harm itself. The idiotic "spreading democracy in Middle East" policy led to the mess in Iraq and Hamas in Palestine.

    If we peacefully work with other nations, given sufficient time they'll be able to work out their own problems. (If not, they'll self-destruct.) China is a good example.
     
  3. lol if you speak about democracy you dissappear. They execute 2000 people a year. And harvest people for their organs. Shade of grey my ass. Its all about the money. the corporations say we want to make money, and the republicans bend over and say do me. Tell me this james, china is a more totalitarian state then cuba. Why dont you deal with cuba.


     
  4. No, China is much much more democratic than Cuba is. Most of the China's low level administrators (equivalent of mayors of small villages) are democratically elected. You don't have that in Cuba. China's media can report pretty much everything, with a few forbidden topics. You don't have that in Cuba. China has an environmental movement, a consumer rights movement, and numerous other "nonpolitical" movements. Cuba doesn't have any of those.

    If you speak about democracy in China, you don't disappear. Every time I went to China, my Chinese friends told me of their dissatisfaction with the government, told me jokes about party leaders, and about the need for a multiparty democracy. None of my Chinese friends have disappeared. Of course, China has a long way to go to be a democracy, but it is not a totalitarian regime as you imagine.