Iceland eruption worse than reported?

Discussion in 'Wall St. News' started by maxpi, Apr 18, 2010.

  1. maxpi

    maxpi

    From a newsletter:



    More to Iceland Volcano than Made Public



    by Mitch Battros - Earth Changes Media


    The damage caused by Iceland volcano "Eyjafjallajokull," could be far more damaging than is being reported. It has happened before, and it could happen again. The last large eruption was in 1695 with consequences lasting seven years and brought Scotland to its knees.

    Below is a just-released video showing what it looks like to drive in Iceland. If this is a major "Eyjafjallajokull" eruption, parts of the United Kingdom may look similar. Not only does such an event change the world's climate for 3 or 4 years, it could cause a financial collapse of the European Union. If they go down --- everybody goes down.

    New Released Video: http://earthchangesmedia.com/publish/article-9162528039.php

    Last Major Eruption

    Outpourings of volcanic ash from Iceland in the 17th Century contributed to a period of famine and hardship in Scotland, according to experts. A major eruption in 1695 saw large parts of the country affected by a "sulphurous fog."



    Prof Alastair Dawson of the University of Aberdeen, writing in the latest Scottish Environment Protection Agency magazine said it came at a time of climatic change. Dust in the atmosphere dimmed sunlight causing crops to fail.

    Prof Dawson says: "We cannot be sure what the precise effect of this eruption was on Scotland's climate but we do know that the years between AD 1693-1700 were characterized by widespread famine." They later became known as the 'King William's Dear Years'.
     
  2. Looks like the eruption was predicted two years ago.

    April 5, 2008

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article3671850.ece

    Increase in volcanic activity is linked to ice melted by global warming
    Lewis Smith

    Leeds Increased volcanic activity is linked to ice melted by the effects of global warming, a study has found.

    So much ice in Iceland has melted in the past century that the pressure on the land beneath has lessened, which allows more of the rock deep in the ground to turn to magma. Until the ice melted, the pressure was so intense that the rock remained solid.

    Carolina Pagli, of the University of Leeds, led research which calculated that over the past century the production of magma had increased by 10 per cent.

    The research team, reporting their findings in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, said an extra 1.4 cu km of magma has been created under the Vatnajökull ice-cap in the past 100 years.

    Since 1890 the ice-cap has lost 10 per cent of its mass, which has allowed the land to rise by up to 25m (82ft) a year. The volume lost between 1890 and 2003 is estimated at 435 cu km.

    How long it will take before the extra magma erupts in Iceland and other regions of the North Atlantic Ridge remains uncertain. It is formed at depths of 15 to 112 km, and Dr Pagli estimated it will be a century or two before it is ejected by volcanoes.
     
  3. olias

    olias

     
  4. <object width="560" height="340"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/9sryalI57oo&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/9sryalI57oo&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="340"></embed></object>

    <object width="560" height="340"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/e8kgYWG1lp0&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/e8kgYWG1lp0&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="340"></embed></object>

    What will happen if the BIG one actually erupts?
     
  5. jem

    jem

    so this would be the non man made global warming.
     
  6. It started with bankers in the U.K. asking 'Where can we find some pansies to sell this CDO crap to?"

    UK "We are going to make ourselves rich by selling wothless CDOs dressed up as jewels to your fishermen banks"
    Iceland "Yeah we are getting rich.... Big Party."
    UK "We will even sell short and bet against the crap we sold you"
    Iceland "Hey, this stuff melted down and is worthless."
    UK "By the way we expect you to tax all your citizens 3 million dollars each to make up for our 'losses'".
    Iceland "FU - stuff it. We voted and ain't paying."
    UK "We'll start seizing your international assets till you pay."
    Iceland "FU. Enjoy some volcanic ash."
    UK "Stop.... you're sinking our economy!"
    Iceland "Maybe you should of thought that before you demanded repayment on the worthless crap you sold us."
    UK "Choke....cough.... choke...."
     
  7. It was on the news earlier that the ash has stopped but that the volcano is still erupting and that they expect worse eruptions in the future.


    Who else thinks this could drive up agricultural commodities?
     
  8. hahahaha...That was too funny. :)
     

  9. UK demanded cash to Iceland, instead, all they got was ash :D
     
  10. 70 Earthquakes in 2010

    California (ChattahBox) – Scientists are currently trying to explain the serious increase in seismic activity in the state of California.

    While the area has been fairly dormant in recent years, the sudden increase in activity has alarmed scientists, who are hard pressed to explain the change.

    Since the beginning of 2010 there have been 70 quakes over a 4.0 magnitude. That is 40 more than there were in the whole of 2009, and it is only April.

    The sudden drastic boost in number is due to an increase in seismic waves in the region, though experts are not sure what has caused it.

    So far, they believe it might just be the activity picking up after a time of lying dormant, entering a new round of quakes that will become increasingly common.

    Scientists say that smaller ones will happen more frequently, but larger earthquakes are sure to be seen more regularly as well.

    “We would like to be able to explain it,” Caltech seismologist Kate Hutton said. “But there’s no real correlation with any cause.”

    http://chattahbox.com/us/2010/04/13/earthquakes-increasing-in-california-region-scientists-say/
     
    #10     Apr 20, 2010