IB Stops

Discussion in 'Retail Brokers' started by flipflopper, May 31, 2007.

  1. Is this information publicly available? If someone places a stop order with Interactive brokers is it visible anywhere?
     
  2. rayl

    rayl

    I don't believe any of the exchanges support native stop orders, so, probably not. To be 110% sure, verify the order types supported by the exchange(s) you're using.
     
  3. LT701

    LT701

    i swear they have to be

    they act like magnets, no matter where you set them
     
  4. Try setting them with a simulator, they are still like magnets. It's you :)

    Ursa..
     
  5. Try trading without them and see what happens.
     
  6. No, your stops cannot be seen by the public. If the market seems to be able to figure out where your stops are located, so that you keep losing money on them, this is because you have a very, very bad, losing strategy for placing your stops. The market manipulates newbie traders into placing their stops at the worst possible places, resulting in losses.
     
  7. Stops are meant to be hit.

    If they were never hit, you wouldn't need to use them.
     
  8. And I'll add, as soon as you plac eyour stops so far away that they can't 'get you', you'll lose EVEN MORE!!!!! lol, just kidding, its an easy game.
     
  9. You know he's talking about those stops that were just 1 tick too close and mark the reversal point of the price-movement.
    The feeling that someone is watching these stops and 'taking them out' can be overwhelming. I had it too, until I noticed that they were also 'taken out' when I put them on in sim-mode, in which case they are not even at the broker, only on my own computer :).

    Ursa..
     
  10. GTC

    GTC

    Market makers, specialists as well as very experienced traders can make a pretty good educated guess where the most other traders' stops would be. That is why those type of stops may seem like magnets even in the simulation account. At IB, I think in fact, you can set different type of stop triggering methods, e.g., double-bid, last, etc.--some with 0.5% leeway.
     
    #10     Jun 1, 2007