how fox news screwed republicans

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by Free Thinker, Nov 9, 2012.

  1. the fox missinformation machine backfired. the republicans started believing their own bullshit and it left them unprepared for the possibility that obama was ahead of them:


    For liberals like me, Fox News was the channel to watch last night. As it became clear early on that Obama was going to take this thing, my household quickly switched the channel from CNN to Fox, eager to see the network’s massive breakdown play out in real time. After all, if the job of Fox News these past four years was to make Obama a one-term president, a goal the network not-incidentally shared with the Republican Party, Fox News super-duper seriously failed.


    In 2009, White House communications director Anita Dunn called Fox News "either the research arm or the communications arm of the Republican Party.” I don’t know about the “or” part. With massive funds and infinite air time, Roger Ailes’ little network that could spent the past four years demonizing president Obama (after a year of demonizing candidate Obama), and obsessively churning up non-news to scare the shit out of white guys and feed into the GOP bloodstream: from the Black Panthers’ remarkable rise to political power to that thing about the guns and Mexico named after an awesome Vin Diesel movie to the multifrontwar on Christmas/Christians/Christ to The Great Benghazi Conspiracy of 2012.


    And what do they have to show for it? Not a Republican president. Not a Republican Senate. Not a repealed health care law. Adding insult to Tuesday’s injury, Eric Holder is still a free man.

    Yes, ratings. Yes, money. I hear you. But if Fox News has any actual interest in helping the Republican Party or the conservative cause—and you can want to do this and make money, just like the GOP!—the network really flubbed it. So what happened, other than the mainstream media oppressors shutting down the truth once again and polling places letting Hispanics in?


    In 2009, Gawker published a post titled “What’s Bad for the GOP is Good for Fox News,” arguing that Republicans’ worst nightmare—the election of a black, Democratic president who listens to the rap music and gives young, female, and non-white Americans hope—was actually a dream come true for Rupert Murdoch’s money-minting, 24-hour news network. Pointing to this illustrative graph, Gawker’s John Cook (who, full disclosure, is my husband) wrote that “the more viewers Fox attracts, the more voters the GOP repels.”

    . . .
    But in 2010, the GOP/Fox News Industrial Complex proved Gawker —and many Democrats who assumed Fox had taken things too far—wrong. With the aid of the Fox-bolstered Tea Party revolution, the Fox-created Socialist-in-Chief, the Fox-aired town hall debacles, and the Fox-supported conspiracy theories of Glenn Beck, Republicans won the House and the narrative. We all gave in and started calling it Obamacare. 2012 looked to be a lost cause.


    But Fox overreached. The midterm results told Sean Hannity and Gretchen Carlson and Megyn Kelly that they were doing something right, and so they kept at it. Donald Trump phoned in from Trump HQ daily to inform Greta Van Susteren’s viewers about his heroic quest for the missing birth certificate. Glenn Beck presented his irrefutable evidence that everything is connected and all roads lead to the Jews/Kenya/Cass Sunstein. Beck finally got canned in 2011, but Hannity picked up some of his nut-job slack. The liberals on Hannity’s panel got paler and sicklier by design (my theory, at least), and the true-believer conservatives became more insufferably confident and dismissive of any potential Obama revival.

    So what does all this delusional thinking have to do with actual voters and their actual votes? As Conor Friedersdorf writes in his very smart Atlantic piece about the failure of the conservative media, it’s “easy to close oneself off inside a conservative echo chamber.” As he points out, Fox News and other conservative media are “far more intellectually closed” than, say, NPR. Fox News feeds its viewers a line of bull about the way the world is. Viewers buy this line of bull. Misinformed viewers become misinformed voters. And then misinformed voters are shocked when Obama wins. Hey, I thought everyone hated this guy? (The preceding is a very good reason why liberals should limit their MSNBC viewing, by the way.)
    http://www.slate.com/articles/news_...he_republican_party_in_the_2012_election.html
     
  2. Nice piece, thanks for sharing. I listen to NPR daily. It is a good source of objective news.