Go See The New "Atlas Shrugged" Movie

Discussion in 'Music, Movies and Entertainment' started by Scataphagos, Sep 17, 2014.

  1. Ricter

    Ricter

    Just curious, does the movie answer the question of where Galt and the industrialists, hiding in the woods, get their food, water, power, medicine, laundry service, banking, and all other goods and services?
     
  2. The book does.

    The movie trilogy is shit.
     
  3. Have you seen the 3rd of the trilogy? It's been out only a few days.
     
  4. No, I stopped after seeing the first.

    Ayn Rand.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2014
    Tsing Tao likes this.
  5. Anyone paying attention already knows the script. For those who haven't, could be an eye opener... and of course, that's the target audience. Morris says the "meat and potatoes" is in the 3rd.

    It's playing at a theater near me, might go see it this weekend. Don't expect to learn anything new, of course.
     
  6. dbphoenix

    dbphoenix

    If this were an actual movie review I would, at this point, pretend to give a shit about the film’s quality. But as anyone who sits through “Atlas Shrugged III” will tell you, the filmmakers themselves don’t give a shit about the film’s quality.

    Back in 2011, when the first installment came out, most reviewers agreed to regard it as a “major motion picture,” though it was funded not by a studio but by an exercise machine mogul named John Aglialoro. As a piece of art, and a form of entertainment, “Atlas Shrugged I” flopped hard.

    But if there’s one thing the conservative movement of this country has proved, it’s that it can move even the most imaginatively inert product. With the ardent promotional support of Fox News and the Tea Party’s corporate arm, the film managed to earn out in video. And thus we got a second “Atlas,” with an all-new cast and even lower production values. This final chapter has an exhausted, obligatory air. It’s like watching the final phases of a botched plastic surgery.

    The director — and co-writer — is a man named James Manera, whose previous work includes a documentary about music and an episode of the television show “Nash Bridges,” which he directed in 1996. I think I’ve said enough about the movie.

    The larger curiosity here is Ayn Rand herself. It would be easy to write her off as a demented Cold War hack no longer relevant to our cultural and political discourse. But that would be a huge mistake. Because Rand’s slobbering conception of laissez-faire capitalism is not only alive and well, it remains a galvanizing ideological force.

    Consider the young darling of conservative circles, former vice-presidential candidate Paul Ryan. Ryan worships Rand. He once gave a speech confessing that he went into public service because of her. He also asked his staffers to read her novels, so they could learn about the free market. During the 2012 campaign, Ryan did a good job of playing down his devotion, because Rand was an atheist.

    But her fingerprints are all over his famous Budget Plan. To the “takers” in our society — the aged and the sick — Ryan would provide rationed healthcare. Federal budgets for education, transportation, energy and veteran services would be slashed. The rich, meanwhile, would be handed billions in tax cuts.

    The whole idea is to do like John Galt says: obliterate any restraints on personal greed. The Ryan Plan is a document so enthusiastic in its fraudulence, so casual in its cruelty, and so certain of its own virtue that it could only have been dreamed up by a man born into money, educated by Ayn Rand, and given finishing lessons in Congress.

    For all the low-budget absurdity of this new movie, the famous speech Rand penned for John Galt back in 1957 still stands as the Rosetta Stone of modern conservatism. This country wasn’t built by men who sought handouts! Sweep aside those parasites of subsidized classrooms! On and on Galt yammers, forever propelled by grievance and self-pity.

    His vision of capitalism is a cartoon that plays over and over again on Fox News: no poverty or environmental ruin or lack of equal opportunity. Mercy is a mug’s game in this world, a false impulse. The pursuit of wealth, by contrast, is a form of heroic purity. If only bureaucrats would get out of the way, our intrepid industrialists would beat a path to paradise and leave the moochers to rot. Rand’s mission — now taken up by Ryan and company — is to present capitalism not as an economic philosophy, but an impeccable moral system.

    The writer and critic Gore Vidal characterized the philosophy of Ayn Rand as “nearly perfect in its immorality” and a number of critics described “Atlas Shrugged” (the novel) as a narrative driven by hate.

    But my take on the book, as well as the movies it spawned, is just the opposite. For all the contempt that Rand (and Galt and Ryan) aim at the government, the predominant emotion they express is one of unbridled self-love. Rand herself was a kind of golem of narcissistic excess, a woman with delusions of grandeur. And she tapped into the crushing insecurity of the wealthy, the manner in which they must constantly remind themselves how much they deserve their privilege.

    What animates these people and drives their chintzy propaganda isn’t rage at all, but a kind of annihilating self-hatred.

    Rush is going to love “Atlas Shrugged III.”

    It’s not just a movie to him. It’s a dream come true.

    STEVE ALMOND
     
  7. The larger curiosity here is Ayn Rand herself. It would be easy to write her off as a demented Cold War hack no longer relevant to our cultural and political discourse. But that would be a huge mistake. Because Rand’s slobbering conception of laissez-faire capitalism is not only alive and well, it remains a galvanizing ideological force.

    His vision (john galt's) of capitalism is a cartoon that plays over and over again on Fox News: no poverty or environmental ruin or lack of equal opportunity. Mercy is a mug’s game in this world, a false impulse. The pursuit of wealth, by contrast, is a form of heroic purity. If only bureaucrats would get out of the way, our intrepid industrialists would beat a path to paradise and leave the moochers to rot. Rand’s mission — now taken up by Ryan and company — is to present capitalism not as an economic philosophy, but an impeccable moral system.

    The writer and critic Gore Vidal characterized the philosophy of Ayn Rand as “nearly perfect in its immorality” and a number of critics described “Atlas Shrugged” (the novel) as a narrative driven by hate.




    The funny thing is that many of her idolizers call themselves "Christians". And she was an atheist.

     
  8. 377OHMS

    377OHMS

    The left hates Ayn Rand for planting the seed of an idea.

    Some of us aren't paying for the leftist dystopia. It isn't some abstract idea from a book though, its a lifestyle... a profession if you will.

    And its not a conservative concept. Most conservatives here would not approve of the arrangements and mechanisms necessary.

    The left can go full-retard authoritarian socialist for all I care.
     
  9. Ricter

    Ricter

    We dis her for her naivety, but more for that of her followers, true believers all. In her book, Rearden Metal is a miracle. In reality its manufacture would likely create waste second only to nuclear for its toxicity. I mean this figuratively. The point is, in her worldview there's no such thing as negative economic externalities. So it's a fantasy, the impossible to attain pure end of the actually messy and complicated spectrum that runs from there to pure collectivism (another impossibility).
     
    #10     Sep 17, 2014