Does 'Precious' movie stereotype big black women?

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by nutmeg, Nov 6, 2009.

  1. She's 16, morbidly obese and illiterate. She lives in 1987 Harlem with her abusive, welfare-scamming, couch-potato mother. Oh, and she's already pregnant for the second time -- by her AIDS-afflicted father.

    Meet Claireece Precious Jones, the unlikely heroine of Lee Daniels' wrenching and uplifting "Precious," which has been wowing both critics and audiences on the festival circuit since January.

    cont on link..

    http://www.nypost.com/p/entertainment/movies/hope_amid_the_horror_LkHGrAN6wNf3N5lNTwt2ZM
     
  2. TGregg

    TGregg

    What? No gay guys? What's Hollywood coming too?
     
  3. Ricter

    Ricter

    What do you mean by stereotyping? Because the protagonist is obese and black she is therefore female? Black and female so therefore she is obese? Poor and female therefore she is black? Just asking.

    As represented in the movie, this person in North America has four strikes against her: dark skin, poverty, female, and obese. Analysing a representative sample of our population and controlling for any one of those attributes reveals their disadvantage in terms of wealth and status, the technical definition of minority.
     
  4. I cant stand most black women actually, most of them are damn obnoxious, pompous always thinking they are entitled to one thing or another
     
  5. The movie is based on the book "Push". I think the author is a lesbo.
     
  6. Ricter

    Ricter

    I have found many street people to be the same way. I've long considered it overcompensation for their low status.
     
  7. It might stereotype, but it shouldn't. What it does is give a pretty good illustration of what happens all too often in the black ghetto and impoverished white America. I've only seen a few clips and read some reviews, but I suspect it would be a tough movie to sit through for both blacks and whites. Hits too close to reality.
     
  8. Mutants attack everything.