Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon

Discussion in 'Psychology' started by nitro, Jan 19, 2011.

  1. nitro

    nitro

    http://www.aolnews.com/2011/01/18/o...her/?icid=maing|main5|dl9|sec1_lnk5|37212_aim
     
  2. sumfuka

    sumfuka

    :D That's where his parent's screwed up. The cow brain is supposed to be served RAW. I guess that is why Bernanke is on the top spot of the FED and not this dude.

    :Lesson:

    Tiger mothers are not very bright themselves.
     
  3. drcha

    drcha

    Nitro,

    Please let us know, why have you posted this? Obviously something about it was of interest to you.
     
  4. nitro

    nitro

    Baffled is more accurate. Like I said in another thread, I don't think we ever left the jungle...When I post something like this, it is an act of desperation, hoping that enough eyes read it and pass along the story. The smallest things sometimes make a huge difference, and maybe someone out there will read it and change their lives...

    I wonder if the Chinese believe in psychology/psychotherapy...
     
  5. Most parents, if not all, wants nothing but the best for their children. It's only in the way that they try to help and improve their child that differs. But I agree with Nitro's point, such ancient practice would bear no good effects, instead it might just cause a psychological trauma to a child.

    I won't be surprised if the children of these tiger mothers would turn out as tiger parents as well. :(
     
  6. nkhoi

    nkhoi Moderator

    just diff way of bringing up the children, she is not that extreme btw
     
  7. drcha

    drcha

    I hope some more Chinese people will weigh in here.

    I heard a curious piece on BBC this AM; maybe some of you did, too. They interviewed rural Chinese residents whose homes were about to be destroyed by a damn project slated to deliver water to large cities. One stated he had been labeled a troublemaker for even discussing his dissatisfaction with having to give up his home for what the government chose to pay him. As an American, I find this social pressure not to make waves in the face of powerlessness very hard to understand. I would like to hear other viewpoints from those who understand this culture better than I do.
     
  8. Tiger moms must be doing something right. try to go for a walk on the campus of Harvard, Columbia or any of the Ivy league universities, vast majority of students appear to be chinese or indian or jewish. I believe the stats say 40% of all students enrolled in Ivy league are comprised of these minority groups.

    I believe this tiger mom the author of this book is a professor at Yale.
     
  9. Well, at least when we drive by a college campus and see a disproportionates numer of Asians, we'll know why.

    =================

    Also, one reason this method of child rearing may not work for the "Americans" is the diversity of our culture and divorce.

    Suppose we had two parents who embraced this method of raising a child, then they divorce. The parenting style has split when the parents divorce and re marry.

    Do we really have a conventional American style of child rearing?

    We might have a "family" of firefighters or policeman, or military or musically inclined, but these are merely spheres of influence.

    This parenting style is part and parcel of the Asian culture, if Asians divorce, the child rearing method is traditional and remains the same no matter who the parents.

    I really don't know this for a fact, just saying....{:>)
     
  10. Kubinec

    Kubinec

    I think when filtered as percentage of said minorities' total population, the Jewish percentage is even higher than both combined.

    As the old Jewish saying goes, a Jewish embryo does not become human until it receives a doctorate degree :D

    Proper rearing aside, there's not much parents can do to make their kid more "talented". Pathbreaking comes with the genes. That's the only role parents should play in their kid's future, finding out where their talents lie and pushing them in that direction.
     
    #10     Jan 23, 2011