How much should one forget to be successful?

Discussion in 'Professional Trading' started by Pension_Admin, Jul 2, 2007.

  1. I heard that a lot of people suggested that in order to trade successfully, one must filter and forget some of the stuffs they know about trading. So, to what extend should one forget?
     
  2. Tough question. It's very easy for new traders to get stuck in paralysis by analysis... but what to get rid of is hard to say in a blanket statement. What works for me will not work for others and vice versa.

    It's a matter of finding what works best for you, which will require many different avenues of pursuit and then forgetting what did not work for you.
     
  3. "I heard that a lot of people suggested that in order to trade successfully, one must filter and forget some of the stuffs they know about trading. So, to what extend should one forget?"

    This bothered me for quite some time. Some things that I've read seem to do more damage than good. "Polluted" my thoughts, my thinking, methods, imo just plain garbage, etc. "How can I unlearn this?".

    Personally for me, I just kept reading and working, the crap fades. It works its way into the background of the psyche and replaced with whatever is relevant. I wouldn't worry about it.
     
  4. insert

    insert

    where did you hear that........you know too much careful

    oh and best you forget what you said :confused:
     
  5. Thanks for the valuable responses guys.

    I have learned a lot during my past years from various sources. When I trade, I toss out all fundamental analysis as well as some technical analysis. I am trying to keep everything simple....so simple that I don't use moving average or RSI anymore, but then I wonder if I am doing the right thing since I am facing a bit of a drawdown. I am not sure if I have make it simple enough.

    So, should one just throw away all technical analysis and just go with a coin toss instead?
     
  6. When I first started trading, I thought, "I'll gather all the information and distill it down to the good stuff".

    Over the years the more I threw out, the better I did.

    Less is more, Grasshopper.
     
  7. "So, should one just throw away all technical analysis and just go with a coin toss instead?"

    Re; the coin toss.

    At the moment I can't remember how this worked out for me, I paper traded coin tosses, may have to try it again. If you opt for the coin toss, then the trade becomes money management. But you still have to correlate to the market (or something), not necessarily another coin toss because historical probability data is out there.

    Actually though, can it ever be 50/50 after you make your first trade or read your first book? It might feel like 50/50. There are dozens of coin toss theories (of course my favorite is Grahams's village of Doddsville), I'm just making the point of money management.
     
  8. zdreg

    zdreg

    hedge fund have figured it out. grow your hedge fund to the pt. where the 2% fee is an annuity for a great lifestyle . that is why you starting to see 3 and 4% fees.

    forget about performance. in the end it is a irrelevant.
     
  9. "forget about performance. in the end it is a irrelevant"

    I'm begining to draw the conclusion that the market is the leftovers of a really fine meal the monied participants ate.

    Blackstone give the dog a bone.
     

  10. Right on the money Gnome.

    In order to use a couple of trading techniques you must first understand just about everything that is available.

    Because I am a relatively quick learner, this process only took me ten years.

    regards
    f9
     
    #10     Jul 3, 2007